PF: Eval and Treatment of External Anal Sphincter (Lab) | 8:43

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7 Comments

  1. Rebecca Marcus says:

    Is your thumb externally, or inserted partially into the sphincter? Is the compression of the lower section using your thumb nail uncomfortable? I use my pad vs. nail for most pelvic floor muscle work?

    1. Lynn Schulte says:

      Your thumb is external. If the muscle is stuck open you might go internally but that is not your intention. The nailbed is not uncomfortable, as I’ve never had anyone complain about it and I keep the index finger in vaginally while I’m assessing the EAS so that is why I use the nailbed. I explain more in the Holistic Treatment of the Postpartum Body course or the Pelvic Floor Course.

  2. I tried releasing the EAS twice this past week. I am anxious to hear how the clients do this week afterward. I also educated them about releasing their own EAS before BMs. Both of them have an anal fissure. I am hoping that I did it correctly!

  3. Candice Kwok says:

    When releasing the top half of EAS with index and thumb pressing, would we be worried about stretching the perineal body if someone already has a larger genital hiatus?

  4. Candice Kwok says:

    When releasing the top half of EAS with index and thumb pressing, would we be worried about stretching the perineal body if someone already has a larger genital hiatus?

    Thanks for your help.

    1. Lynn Schulte says:

      You are not stretching the tissues with this technique. You are compressing the “knot” or thickened tissues between your fingers. Thumb pushes up as much as finger pushed down. Don’t move the tissues down as you do so. There should be no concern for genital hiatus with the technique when done correctly. Does this make sense?

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